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Cooking Thread~ Recipes & Things

Discussion in 'General' started by Biigoh, May 1, 2013.

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  1. Threadmarks: Roti Canai - Ilikebob
    Ilikebob

    Ilikebob Wish Granter Extraordinaire

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    Alright, so first up, roti canai. It's an India derived flatbread which pops up in Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. It's main ingredient is flour and margarine. It's usually eaten with curry.

    Ingredients:
    1. Wheat flour, 500g
    2. Margarine, 200g
    3. Water, 100ml
    4. Salt
    5. Vegetable oil
    Preparation:
    1. Mix the flour, margarine, salt and water in a bowl, knead it thoroughly.
    2. Make 50g balls from the dough and roll each of them into tubes. Fold the tubes like a snake and pour them some vegetable oil.
    3. Flatten the doughs into desired size.
    4. Sauté the bread and flip them after 3 minutes on each side.
    5. Take the bread and let it dry on a napkin. Serve it while it's hot.
     
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  2. kinglugia

    kinglugia A Randy Avian

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    Or dal (some form of sauce based on lentils), or something equally salty and savory.
    Not in mamak stalls you don't :V
     
  3. Threadmarks: Bacon and maple roast chicken - Konamikode Link
    konamikode

    konamikode Objectified SI

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    Regarding birds that dry out quickly and are hard to fully flavor if cooked whole, I did have some ideas about going a bit further than stuffing a chicken or injecting it with marinade/ranch.

    I thought about cutting open and placing a mixture of bacon and fruit marinade underneath the skin of the breast. Quick google search found me this recipe I'm thinking about using for my next bird day.

    https://www.foodrepublic.com/recipes/bacon-and-maple-roast-chicken-recipe/
     
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  4. Rakdos92

    Rakdos92 Not too sore, are you?

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    How do you make Poutine? As far as I understood, it's fries with gravy and shredded cheese melted over it, is that correct?
     
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  5. Biigoh

    Biigoh Nothing but Innocent Fluff Moderator

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    Poutine, you say?

     
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  6. Riddle78

    Riddle78 Know what you're doing yet?

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    No. Shredded cheese is a big no-no. It's French fries,nice and hot,with room-temperature cheese curds,and hot gravy over top of it all. This ensures that the cheese partially melts,and has good stretch and squeak when you chew it. And this is poutine in its most basic form. Common additions include onion,ground meats,mushrooms,peppers,and apple slices.

    Biigoh has a proper recipe above. But it's a cardinal sin to use shredded cheese on poutine,at least where I'm from.
     
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  7. seeing_octarine

    seeing_octarine Unverified Colour

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    Considering what curds and cheese are, and that the internet is telling me cheese curds is mainly a Canadian thing... is cottage cheese an acceptable substitute? Just curious.
     
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  8. aquinas

    aquinas Not too sore, are you?

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    No. If you're going that way, maybe chop up some mozzarella, it wouldn't be right, but it wouldn't be horribly horribly wrong.
     
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  9. MadGreenSon

    MadGreenSon Verified Devil Tiger

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    Or since poutine looks like a pain in the ass, you can just microwave some frozen burritos until they're mostly ready, then cover 'em with Hormel chili and shredded cheddar and mozzarella, and microwave 'em until that cheese is melted and the chili is steaming. The throw a bit of sour cream on it and eat it. It is exactly nothing like poutine, but it tastes like... you're committing a sin against decency, which tastes pretty damn good.
     
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  10. seeing_octarine

    seeing_octarine Unverified Colour

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    Looking into it further, the only reason it's a problem is because regular cottage cheese often has some cream mixed in to the curds. Using a low fat or non-creamed variant should be a near exact equivalence.
     
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  11. aquinas

    aquinas Not too sore, are you?

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    The big problem there is texture. You've got something on the scale of a fingerling potato with a snappy squeaky texture vs tiny nodules maybe with leftover whey. Not saying you couldn't come up with something good with cottage cheese, but that isnt a good substitute.

    Also, who knows what'd do when heated?
     
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  12. Biigoh

    Biigoh Nothing but Innocent Fluff Moderator

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    For a close substitute for the cheese curds, use torn chunks (not the shredded) of a full-fat mozzarella cheese. Not fresh mozzarella, use the kind you would put on top of pizza.
     
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  13. Threadmarks: Ancient Recipes from WW2 - Youtube
    konamikode

    konamikode Objectified SI

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    Got lost on the youtube and got squirreled into an interesting bit of historical cooking goodness :3

    Here's a link to WW2 US Army field kitchens and an updated technical manual (cookbook) published postwar in 1946. Interesting skim, actually. Found a 1944 version, but the quality wasn't quite as good.
     
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  14. Threadmarks: 'Quick' and Simple Shawarma Chicken - Biigoh
    Biigoh

    Biigoh Nothing but Innocent Fluff Moderator

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    Ingredients
    1 lb. chicken thighs – boneless, skinless
    juice of 1 lemon
    1 to 2 teaspoons ground cumin
    3 cloves of garlic, chopped
    ¼ cup olive oil
    1 teaspoon paprika
    ¼ teaspoon turmeric
    dash of Chinese 5 Spice (it's suppose to be plain cinnamon)
    1 red onion, quartered

    Instructions
    1 - Mix everything but the chicken and onion in a large bowl.
    2 - Add the chicken, toss to coat well.
    3 - Cover and let it marinate in the frige for an hour or so.
    4 - Pre-heat oven to 425f.
    5 - Add a tablespoon of olive oil to grease a rimmed sheet pan. Remove the chicken from the marinade, and place on the pan.
    6 - Brush some of the marinade onto the onion quarters and add to pan.
    7 - Cook for 30-40 minutes
    8 - Remove from the oven, allow to rest a couple of minutes, then slice.

    9 - Serve on a platter with chopped tomatos, sliced cucumber, yogurt, pita.... etc.
     
  15. Threadmarks: Buttermilk Fried Chicken - UrsaTempest
    UrsaTempest

    UrsaTempest Fanatical Yuri Bear (and Archivist)

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    Alright, QQ. Here is my version of slapdash buttermilk fried chicken. Base (and proper) recipe is here, and to be honest there's not much change except you gotta forgive yourself a lot during the process.

    Here's what you need:
    (Mostly whole) Chicken
    Salt
    Pepper
    Flour
    Buttermilk (alternative: fresh milk and white vinegar)
    Vegetable oil
    Two eggs
    Baking powder

    You'll also need stove and frying pan.

    Instruction
    1. Get appropriate chicken. Preferably young, preferably small-ish, and preferably you cut yourself as according to the video. If not, ask the butcher to cut it.
    (Optional) Boil the chicken to make chicken stock, because I am stingy with what I bought and I like chicken stock proper.
    2. Season your cut chicken liberally with pepper and salt on one side, then the other.
    3. Put all those seasoned chicken in some kind of container (small enough so it's tight fit, preferably) and flood them with buttermilk. If you don't have buttermilk, add a spoon of vinegar in a glass of milk. Stir, until it become clump-y, then pour them into the container. Make sure it cover the chicken.
    4. Chuck 'em to fridge and leave it be for 10-24~ hours.
    5. Take them out of fridge.
    6. Make the breading: enough flour, salt, pepper, and a spoon of baking powder. Mix the breading.
    7. Crack an egg and scramble it, put it on separate container. A bowl or something. Large-ish, preferably.
    8. Take out the chicken one by one, then coat them with egg, before coating them with the breading. Repeat, until every chicken is coated.
    9. Crack another egg on the chicken container containing all those buttermilk. Coat the coated chicken with buttermilk-egg mixture, then coat them with the breading. Repeat, until every chicken is re-coated.
    10. Leave them alone for fifteen minutes to one hour.
    11. Fry them. Use the lowest possible heat. Don't forget to flip them when appropriate!
    12. Eat them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
    aquinas, Sydonai and kinglugia like this.
  16. Threadmarks: Soup of Theseus - UrsaTempest
    UrsaTempest

    UrsaTempest Fanatical Yuri Bear (and Archivist)

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    Pseudo-Perpetual Soup (or simple vegetable soup, Soup of Theseus (courtesy of Nekraa, for the name))

    For some reason, people (IRL) don't expect me to be able to make simple soup. Huh. I'm slighted! And because of that, I'll share you how to make this. Note that I use a combination of beef and chicken - pork is rare to nonexistent here, so I can't say if it'll work (it should be, though). Garlic and shallot is basically the staple aromatics here, so if that's not available you may use onion, or others, I guess. Amount of ingredients really depend on how big is your cooking vessel, and to be honest I basically eyeball everything anyway, so:

    Ingredients:
    1. Potatoes
    2. Carrots
    3. Peas
    4. Garlic
    5. Shallot
    6. Chicken/Beef (just pick the cheapest cut, or even ask for scrap for free or nominal fee.)
    7. Salt
    8. Pepper
    9. Reasonably clean water.

    You'll also need stove, and a pot to hold all of them. Plus food containers. And knife. And cutting board!

    First, make a fairly pure chicken/beef stock:
    1. Pile all of the chicken/beef inside the pot, preferably a big pot if you have one.
    2. Fill it with water until everything inside the pot is drowned.
    3. Bring it to boil. Afterward, lower the fire until it shimmering.
    4. Leave it alone but check it occasionally until the water is one-third of previous height.
    5. This will take a while. At least an hour or two. Go shitpost on QQ or something.
    6, Take out all the meat, set it aside, Pour the stock to heat-resistant container, and let it sit until it cool before putting them to freezer.
    7. On the new stock, you might see a whitish solid floated on top. Those are fat - feel free to with spoon to throw away or keep. I like using those for frying or making rice.
    8. Pick all your favorite cut from the boiled meat above, fry 'em or something. Put the rest on separate container.

    Now, for the soup:
    1. Cut potatoes and carrots to your preferred size/shape. Just imagine if you'll feel comfortable stuffing those in your mouth - if not, cut it smaller until you do.
    2. If your peas need to be cut, do that. But put those on separate container from potatoes and carrots.Oh, if your stock is frozen, bring 'em out.
    3. Cut your garlic and shallot. Get decent amount of them.
    4. It is time. Pick the pot for your soup, dump your potatoes and carrots there. You don't want them to completely filled the pot, at least leave third free.
    5. Fill it with water until everything drowned. Then dump garlic and shallot inside. The one you just cut.
    6. Turn on the stove until it's boiling. Periodically check if the potatoes and carrots softened enough, by stabbing fork/spoon to them, and if it get through.
    7. When it does, dump the peas in and let it boil for, dunno, two to five minutes or so, I guess.
    8. Now add salt and pepper and stock, a bit. Taste it. Is it good? No? Add more salt/pepper/stock. Keep doing this until the taste is good.
    9. Ladle your soup and promptly eat it!

    But what about the pseudo-perpetual part? Well, it was based on the idea of perpetual stew, but since I can't afford running stove forever, or even slow cooker, some modification is... necessary. But the gist is:

    1. Don't drink/throw away the leftover soup from the pot. Strain them, store the solid and liquid part separately in the freezer.
    2. Unfreeze them for the next day, continue doing the above until nothing solid left.
    3. When you want to make a new soup, simply use the liquid leftover as base! Do add water/stock/salt/pepper/etc as necessary, though.

    Feel free to experiment, but I suggest sticking to root vegetables plus legumes is the way to go. They tend to survive best on above treatment.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  17. Threadmarks: Gordon Ramsay's Top 5 Pork Recipes - Youtube
    Biigoh

    Biigoh Nothing but Innocent Fluff Moderator

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